The Writing Advice Not Taken

Also known as "The writing advice I wish I'd had in 2011." I ran into someone on a Facebook group today, asking for help. This person had a bunch of books out, and none of them were selling. I went and analyzed the writer's work, and recognized a familiar set of problems. The writer was doing a bunch of things wrong - most of them, the same things *I* messed up, early on. Hey, these are easy mistakes to make. There's no guidebook. (Well, there are, but the advice is often conflicting and confusing.)

After assessing the writer's work, I wrote a reply. It was a public group, and a lot of people wrote nice replies offering counsel. I wrote a veritable essay. Not shocking for those who know me! I'm a writer - I saw someone in trouble, facing a lot of the problems I had to overcome the hard way. I wanted to help. The writer turned down my advice, which is sad, but some people have to go their own path and learn in their own way. That's certainly how I managed it.

But a number of other writers suggested I save the essay anyway, as it had a lot of value for other people as well. Here's the essay, for posterity. If you're a struggling newer writer in this crazy modern era of publishing, give it a read. You might be facing none of these issues, or all of them. But if there's even one bit in there which might help you, I'll be happy. Not ALL of the advice below is going to be correct for EVERY writer, mind you! Read it through the lens of your own experience and situation.

I'll pitch in a little here. This is going to sound harsh, some of it.

You're making all of the classic blunders. Welcome to my world.  I did the same thing - made most of the SAME mistakes that you are making. As a result, I made virtually nothing from my writing for five straight years of publishing.

I have cleared four figures a month every month since last August. I did so by turning things around. By not making the same mistakes. You can too.

1. Classic Blunder One You're ALL OVER THE PLACE in genres. You have mysteries, urban fantasy, and science fiction. Stop that shit now. PICK A GENRE. ANY GENRE. Now write your next 10-12 books in that genre alone. No hopping around. Just do the work.

2. Classic Blunder Two Your covers suck. With the exception of the mystery covers, which more or less meet the minimum standards for the genre, your covers range from badly targeted (the UF cover looks like a middle-grade novel) to horrible (the SF covers just need to go) to no cover at all (why do half your books have a blank white page?). Study the genre you pick, and make your cover look as close to the bestsellers in that genre AND sub-genre as possible.

3. Classic Blunder Three Too many series. Stop. Write ONE series until the series is done. Make that series at least three books long. Ideally, make it 6+ books long. Again, you're all over the place and this is killing any hope of building momentum.

4. Classic Blunder Four You are overpricing your books. Drop your prices to $2.99. Yes, there is a difference between $2.99 and $3.99. You are a new writer. You want people to take a chance on you. Dropping price early on will help. Raise them later when you're better known. Once you have the third or fourth book out in a series, drop book one to 99c as a loss leader.

Less Obvious and Less Classic Issues:

- You're misusing Instafreebie. There are two ways to drive traffic to your IF books. You need to either run Facebook ads targeting your target market which send people to the IF book - OR - you need to join group promotions *which target your genre*. You should be getting about 500-1000 new subscribers a month just from joint promos. If you're not doing that, join more joint promos until you are. These leads are not the best; you will need to offer them samples of your writing to hook them. But they can be hooked. Again, part of maximizing IF use and even mailing list use in general is STICKING TO ONE GENRE. If your reader signed up for police mysteries, and you send them a SF book, they're going to unsubscribe.

- Your blurbs need help. Your blurbs are too short. Well written, but not enough meat there. THIS IS WHERE YOU CONVINCE THEM TO BUY. You need to sell the book with the blurb. Really key.

- Edit to add: You're also not publishing fast enough. Two books a year will result in a VERY slow build even if you follow the guidelines above. Bump up your speed to four+. Write the next book. Nothing matters more than the next book. Write in one genre, in a series, and get the next book done and out to readers. THIS IS A MOMENTUM GAME. You're either BUILDING momentum, or you are losing it. ALWAYS. Write in a new genre? You're building momentum there, but not where you were building it, so you're likely LOSING momentum there unless you're writing a book a month.